Zones

From Australasia to Wild Africa, our zones replicate diverse animal habitats around the world.

Animals in Our Care

African lion

African lion

Lions live in social groups known as prides, made up of one or more mature males, several closely-related females and their young. Males roar and spray urine to advertise their territory to rivals.

African painted dog

African painted dog

Hunting dogs look out for their pack members, especially the young and the sick.

Aldabra giant tortoise

Aldabra giant tortoise

Naturally found at Aldabra Atoll, learn how we provide world-class care to our endangered Aldabra giant tortoises at Singapore Zoo.

Asian elephant

Asian elephant

When size doesn't help. With 40,000-50,000 left in the wild, will the last of the megaherbivores be wiped out too?

Asian small clawed otter

Asian small clawed otter

These smallest of 13 otter species in the world are social and playful animals.

Babirusa

Babirusa

Babirusa means pig deer in Malay due to its tusks that look very much like the antlers of a deer.

Bornean orangutan

Bornean orangutan

Orangutans are apes, which means that unlike monkeys, they do not have a tail. Found in the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra, they have special feet with long toes for grasping branches, and long limbs that can stretch out far so that they can move easily through the treetops. Orangutan babies stay with their mother for 7 to 8 years to learn survival skills. Play is an important way for them to learn these skills.

Brown lemur

Brown lemur

Just droppin’ by. These round-eyed lemurs are frequent visitors at the Treetops Trail.

Californian sea lion

Californian sea lion

Adept swimmers, the Californian sea lions have a streamlined body and ear passages and nostrils can be closed underwater.

Celebes crested macaque

Celebes crested macaque

This macaque is one of the world’s 25 most endangered primates. Swing over to Primate Kingdom to meet them.

Cheetah

Cheetah

The fastest land animals, differentiate from other spotted cats by two black tear lines that extend from the corner of their eyes to the mouth.

Chimpanzee

Chimpanzee

Humans and chimps are thought to share a common ancestor who lived 4-8 million years ago.

Cotton-top tamarin

Cotton-top tamarin

Tamarins usually have twins or triplets. Dad piggybacks the babies most of the time, passing them back to mum only when the babies need to nurse.

Eastern black-and-white Colobus monkey

Eastern black-and-white Colobus monkey

See more of our Colobus monkeys at Primate Kingdom. They are capable of leaping up to 15 metres and are rarely seen on ground.

Electric blue gecko

Electric blue gecko

This diurnal gecko is found only in Tanzania's Kimboza and Ruvu Forest Reserves, where it dwells exclusively on pandan plants, which are associated with swamps or limestone within the forest.

Estuarine crocodile

Estuarine crocodile

Adult males can reach lengths of 7m. It is also the croc with the widest distribution.

False gharial

False gharial

Fossa

Fossa

What makes the fossa Madagascar’s top predator? Its adaptations include a good sense of smell and keen vision, even in low-light conditions.

Gaboon viper

Gaboon viper

This snake’s brilliant beauty and easygoing temperament belie its tenacity as a predator.

Giraffe

Giraffe

Two young Rothschild’s giraffes Adhil and Balaji arrived at Singapore Zoo, part of a globally managed breeding programme under the EAZA Ex-situ Programme.

Golden poison frog

Golden poison frog

Known for their extreme toxicity, these frogs produce toxins twenty times more potent than that of any other poison dart frog.

Greater mousedeer

Greater mousedeer

Despite their names, greater mousedeer are neither rodents nor true deer. They belong to their own unique family, Tragulidae, and are considered one of the most primitive living ungulates (hoofed mammals)!

Green basilisk

Green basilisk

The green basilisk lizard is also known as the plumed or double-crested basilisk. Males can be distinguished by the showy crests on their heads and backs, which are used to impress females.

Grey kangaroo

Grey kangaroo

One of the largest kangaroo species commonly found in Australia, the eastern grey kangaroo swims well and evades predators by diving.

Hamadryas baboon

Hamadryas baboon

Hamadryas baboon are hardy monkeys with a strong build and a dog-like snout. Males and females look so dissimilar that they have been thought to be of different species.

Indian crested porcupine

Indian crested porcupine

Indian gharial

Indian gharial

The Indian gharial is a critically endangered species that is estimated to have fewer than 200 left in the wild.

Komodo dragon

Komodo dragon

The world’s largest lizard is also one of the few lizards with a venomous bite.

Leopard

Leopard

The leopard has the practice of heaving its kill up into the limbs of a tree for undisturbed feeding. Assisted by powerful limb, neck and jaw muscles, it can easily drag a carcass that weighs more than itself!

Lesser mousedeer

Lesser mousedeer

With a rodent-like face and a rabbit's body perched precariously atop the pencil-thin feet of a piglet, the mousedeer looks like an odd mix of different animals.

Macaw

Macaw

Malayan flying fox

Malayan flying fox

With a wingspan of 1.5 – 1.7m, these are some of the largest bats in the world.

Malayan tiger

Malayan tiger

Revered as a symbol of power and strength for its near-supernatural grace and agility.

Meerkat

Meerkat

Mini pig

Mini pig

Naked mole rat

Naked mole rat

Naked mole rats can survive longer than any other rodents, and suspected to be resistant against cancer. Learn more about their secret to staying cancer-free.

Panther chameleon

Panther chameleon

Head down to RepTopia to find out why and how panther chameleons are considered opportunistic hunters.

Proboscis monkey

Proboscis monkey

The largest breeding group of proboscis monkeys outside its range is found in Singapore Zoo.

Pygmy goat

Pygmy goat

Pygmy hippo

Pygmy hippo

Too dense to float and swim in water, the pygmy hippo tiptoes along riverbeds instead.

Rabbit

Rabbit

Long movable ears and large eyes placed high on the head, providing near-360° vision, help rabbits detect predators from afar. Powerful hind-limbs help them make a quick getaway.

Red-shanked douc langur

Red-shanked douc langur

The douc langur's almond eyes and delicate features lend a kind of wistful magic to their beauty.

Red river hog

Red river hog

Red ruffed lemur

Red ruffed lemur

With rich rust-red fur offsetting a jet-black face, these are easily among the most beautiful of primates.

Regal horned lizard

Regal horned lizard

Game for a scaly good time? Slither down to RepTopia at Singapore Zoo and learn more about the regal horned lizard.

Ring-tailed lemur

Ring-tailed lemur

A repertoire of some 22 different calls helps these primates engage in complex social interactions.

Roti snake-necked turtle

Roti snake-necked turtle

This turtle’s snake-like, long neck is about two-thirds the length of its shell.

Siamang

Siamang

Skunk

Skunk

Sulcata tortoise

Sulcata tortoise

Sumatran orangutan

Sumatran orangutan

<p>Orangutans are apes, which means that unlike monkeys, they do not have a tail. Found in the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra, they have special feet with long toes for grasping branches, and long limbs that can stretch out far so that they can move easily through the treetops.</p> <p>Orangutan babies stay with their mother for 7 to 8 years to learn survival skills. Play is an important way for them to learn these skills.</p>

Sun bear

Sun bear

This smallest of all bear species gets its name from the U-shaped golden marking on its chest.

Tree kangaroo

Tree kangaroo

These kangaroos traverse the treetops with ease with their powerful arms, sharp claws and long tail.

Two-toed sloth

Two-toed sloth

Whether they are sleeping, eating, mating, or giving birth, sloths carry out most of their activities hanging upside-down from tree branches.

White-faced saki monkey

White-faced saki monkey

Sakis can make downward leaps covering close to 10m, a feat which has earned them the nickname “flying monkeys”. Head down to Fragile Forest or Primate Kingdom zones to see them in action.

White rhinoceros

White rhinoceros

A huge animal that feeds exclusively on grass, the white rhino has a wide mouth shaped for ‘mowing’ short grass. Its square lips set it apart from the hook-lipped black rhino.

White tiger

White tiger

White tigers are not albinos or a different sub-species of tigers. Their white coat, brown stripes and blue eyes are the result of a mutated gene. Both white and orange-coloured tiger cubs can be found in the same litter.

Zebra

Zebra

Stallions of this species mark and maintain territories using middens (dung piles). The Grevy's zebra is distinguished from other zebras by its round ears, white underbelly and the bullseye stripe pattern on its rump.

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